• '

    Nāvar Initiation (Zoroastrian Priesthood)

    '

    Cotton thread hand embroidery applied over hand-woven green windowpane check cotton tea towel. (440 x 440mm)


    BILDUNGSROMAN
    Malcolm Smith Gallery
    2018

    Navar Initiation (Zoroastrian Priesthood)

    The floor spilled with Swadeshi tiles & Qom silk rugs, the bohemian crystal chandeliers contained delicately placed oil lamps and the walls were covered with dusty, velveteen oil paintings of many deceased benefactors and local families. It read like a who’s who of Surat’s Parsi elite up until the mid-1900's. One room that I stumbled upon (and spent considerable time documenting) was that most spartan but personal of sites: The space where holy sacraments are given to elemental deities at different times of the year and also where young Mobeds (Zoroastrian priests) such as myself would’ve learned fire-keeping and practiced holy ceremonial teachings. Here we had humble Rajasthani Kota stone floors with stone benches where priests would solemnly sit cross-legged in their sheer muslin robes, praying and tending to the elements.

    The room was vacant and I just walked in alone to discover three window shutters letting in rays of afternoon light that caught the smoky air particles to form dramatic beams against the silver chalices and landed gracefully toward the floor.

    A tender place where one could sense the reverence of those who had just vacated the room. Luckily the priests must’ve been napping or having lunch at this time, so I managed to get around very easily today. The perfect finale to this non-pilgrim’s quest for spiritual iconography.

    From Journal Extract xxi
    Sunday 23rd December 2018
    Steps outside Shehenshah Atash Behram,
    Surat, Gujarat (16:45)

    '

    Nāvar Initiation (Zoroastrian Priesthood)

    '

    Cotton thread hand embroidery applied over hand-woven green windowpane check cotton tea towel. (440 x 440mm)


    BILDUNGSROMAN
    Malcolm Smith Gallery
    2018

  • '

    Still Life, Spin & Thrust

    '

    Cotton thread hand embroidery on repurposed green gingham dust cloth (c. 1990).
    (390 x 355mm)


    BILDUNGSROMAN
    Malcolm Smith Gallery
    2018

    Still Life, Spin & Thrust
    Still Life, Spin & Thrust

    A well-used found green cotton gingham rag. A repurposed textile embroidered with forms and linear movements within the domestic realm; juxtaposing objects from the Tata Collection of Chinoiserie & Porcelain (bequeathed to Mumbai's CSMVS, formerly Prince of Wales Museum c. 1910). A saffron jar wobbles. A ceiling fan swirls.

    Adjacent to the dynamism of an enigmatic form derived from ‘Thrust (a study)’ (originally executed in teakwood, 1991) by Parsi-born J.J School of Arts sculptor Adi Davierwalla.

    Extract from the artist's contextual notes

    '

    Still Life, Spin & Thrust

    '

    Cotton thread hand embroidery on repurposed green gingham dust cloth (c. 1990).
    (390 x 355mm)


    BILDUNGSROMAN
    Malcolm Smith Gallery
    2018

  • '

    Agiary Series

    '

    Panel i: Batliwalla Agiary (Closed Threshold)
    Panel ii: Temple of Anāhita
    Panel iii: It’ll Rot if You Don’t Chew Fast, Shirin!


    Cotton thread hand embroidery applied over hand-loomed cotton khatka textile.
    (431 x 431mm each)


    BILDUNGSROMAN
    Malcolm Smith Gallery
    2018

    Agiary Series
    Agiary Series

    The tale of a piece of simple cloth that now tells a grand story, captures his imagination. (Katki) eschews the more extravagant frontiers of Parsi textile tradition — bypassing sumptuous brocades, riotously embroidered silk ‘Garas’ and quilted bridal mantles — and selecting to embroider over everyday cloths sourced during his travels: ‘Khatka’ dust rags used for cleaning; repurposed stripey teatowels hand-woven

    in Bombay during the 1940’s; cotton khadi handkerchiefs; handwoven West Bengali mul; green 1990’s gingham dustcloths; a 1950’s floral coaster and fragments of tablecloths and useful bags.

    Extract from introductory exhibition essay by Anna Miles

    Agiary Series
    Agiary Series
    '

    Agiary Series

    '

    Panel i: Batliwalla Agiary (Closed Threshold)
    Panel ii: Temple of Anāhita
    Panel iii: It’ll Rot if You Don’t Chew Fast, Shirin!


    Cotton thread hand embroidery applied over hand-loomed cotton khatka textile.
    (431 x 431mm each)


    BILDUNGSROMAN
    Malcolm Smith Gallery
    2018

  • '

    Bildungsroman

    '

    (Debut Solo Exhibition)
    Malcolm Smith Gallery
    2nd Feb - 17th March 2019
    Organised by Zoe Hoeberigs

    Bildungsroman
    Bildungsroman

    In March 2018 Areez Katki set off from his East Auckland home for Mumbai on a carefully conceived quest to trace his creative inheritance as the son of a Parsi Indian family with ancient Persian roots. Katki’s ruminations on what it means to be Parsi are inclusive of small acts of kindness and the razed ramparts of civilisations.

    Bildungsroman parallels Katki’s grand tour journal, which conveys the sincere curiosity of an expatriate outsider prying into the closed Zoroastrian community with questions of gender, sexuality and politics in mind.

    Extract from introductory exhibition text by Anna Miles

    '

    Bildungsroman

    '

    (Debut Solo Exhibition)
    Malcolm Smith Gallery
    2nd Feb - 17th March 2019
    Organised by Zoe Hoeberigs

  • '

    Dwelling

    '

    Marabar Caves
    The Gus Fisher Gallery
    August – September 2017
    Organised by Victoria Wynne-Jones
    Photographs by Samuel Hartnett

    Dwelling
    Dwelling

    Marabar Caves was an exhibition that took its title from the caves featured in E.M. Forster’s 1924 novel 'Passage to India.' This is the first exhibition in a series of three entitled ‘Resources of the Social Imagination’ by Victoria Wynne-Jones, which will look at the relationships between narrative pleasure and contemporary art. Narratives that are cosmological, geological and mythical combine to describe a space that is highly sculptural, one that becomes psychosexual with the aid of a colonial gaze.

    Audio, ceramics, embroidery and exhibition design form a response to Forster's description of the caves. Areez Katki has investigated non-linguistic narrative techniques using synaesthesia and his applied arts textile practice. Devices designed to lean against and languish on have been constructed and embroidered upon for the exhibition.



    Organised by Victoria Wynne-Jones.

    Dwelling
    Dwelling
    '

    Dwelling

    '

    Marabar Caves
    The Gus Fisher Gallery
    August – September 2017
    Organised by Victoria Wynne-Jones
    Photographs by Samuel Hartnett

  • '

    Ravel Scroll: Daybreak

    '

    Vanished Delft
    The Pah Homestead
    March – May 2017
    Curated by Anna Miles
    Photographs by Samuel Hartnett

    Ravel Scroll: Daybreak
    Ravel Scroll: Daybreak

    Areez Katki described his 5-metre-drop of hand-embroidered silk hanging in the Ball Room of Vanished Delft, as a synaesthesic response to the score of Maurice Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloe, a ballet based on the ancient Greek Longus’ novel of the same name. It was performed by the Ballet Russes in Paris in 1912, with sets designed by Leon Bakst. Katki discovered the music when he was traveling in the Basque Country of Spain, the region where Ravel was born.

    His work predominantly uses chain stitch: “No other stitch has been as effective to express linear movement.” There are notes – embroidered in a dull grey thread – on the panel where he acknowledges Longus, the island of Lesbos – the setting of the novel – and roman numerals which correspond to the pages of the composition that Katki listened to. “Other than these small details, there is no concrete evidence of structure or narrative,” says Katki.

    Extract from curatorial notes by Anna Miles

    Ravel Scroll: Daybreak
    Ravel Scroll: Daybreak
    '

    Ravel Scroll: Daybreak

    '

    Vanished Delft
    The Pah Homestead
    March – May 2017
    Curated by Anna Miles
    Photographs by Samuel Hartnett

  • '

    Constantinople Dress

    '

    Beauty Is In The Street
    Ramp Gallery
    April – June 2017

    Constantinople Dress
    Constantinople Dress

    Cotton, Silk & Linen fibres / Mounting on pinewood dowels.

    Sources: Turkey, Lebanon & India.

    Treatments: Indigo, Madder, Tea (Ceylon) and Wine (NZ Merlot)

    Hand knitted using intarsia colour-blocking and fair isle techniques.

    The fabrication of Katki’s Constantinople Dress was an attempt to capture various sensations caused by movements through time and placement/displacement. Harnessing both emotional and physical responses to a setting he lived in, Areez created a series of abstract motifs knitted into a three-dimensional object.

    '

    Constantinople Dress

    '

    Beauty Is In The Street
    Ramp Gallery
    April – June 2017

  • '

    Vienna Series

    '

    Presented at Objectspace
    2016 - 2017

    Vienna Series
    Vienna Series

    A series of hand-embroidered scarves on narrow hand-loomed silk noil. Annual edition of six scarves from the Vienna Series have been crafted by Areez each year since 2014, each numbered and dated.

    An act of restraint during tactile productivity. The applied methodology for this series tie in with Katki’s reverence for motifs from the Viennese Secession movement.

    Vienna Series
    Vienna Series
    '

    Vienna Series

    '

    Presented at Objectspace
    2016 - 2017

  • '

    Dwelling Series

    '

    Masterworks Gallery
    November 2017

    Dwelling Series
    Dwelling Series

    Limited series of decorative domestic objects: Hand-embroidered upholstered cushions and bolsters.

    Outer: French cotton thread on a selection of hand-woven cotton, linen and silk textiles that were sourced from India, Turkey and France.

    Inner: Bamboo fibre and cotton wadding.

    Cotton inner filling. 2017 – 2018.

    Dwelling Series
    '

    Dwelling Series

    '

    Masterworks Gallery
    November 2017

  • '

    Daybreak Textile Study Panel

    '

    Rannoch Estate
    From 'Vanished Delft'
    February 2017
    Photographs by Samuel Hartnett

    Daybreak Textile Study Panel
    Daybreak Textile Study Panel

    At a recent talk for Objectspace’s National Symposium on Craft, Applied Arts and Design at the Auckland War Memorial Museum, Areez Katki described himself as a practitioner of the applied arts with a specific interest in textiles and apparel. He made a distinction between the craftsperson couturier and the contemporary fashion designer, who encourages consumption.

    “There is often little need in the life of an average person for thirty sub-standard sweaters and five amazing ones,” he noted, charactarising contemporary “applied arts hierarchy,” as having, “industrialised the game and made it less personal … I’d rather just create. With my own two hands.”

    Extracted from curatorial notes by Anna Miles

    '

    Daybreak Textile Study Panel

    '

    Rannoch Estate
    From 'Vanished Delft'
    February 2017
    Photographs by Samuel Hartnett

  • '

    Bask Hat Series (I-II)

    '

    Collaboration with Godmother
    February 2017* (I) & December 2017 (II)

    *Presented at Allpress Gallery

    Bask Hat Series (I-II)
    Bask Hat Series (I-II)

    Crafted as an ongoing collaborative series using carefully sourced textiles that are treated and overdyed by Kirsty Cameron of Godmother. Each bask hat panel has been individually hand-embroidered by Katki using a close set of of needlework drawing techniques. Bonded, lined & constructed in collaboration with Godmother.

    Bask Hat Series (I-II)
    Bask Hat Series (I-II)
    '

    Bask Hat Series (I-II)

    '

    Collaboration with Godmother
    February 2017* (I) & December 2017 (II)

    *Presented at Allpress Gallery

  • '

    Shirt Series

    '

    Textile Collaboration with Sherie Muijs
    Developed 2017-2018
    Phorographs by Greta Van Der Star

    Shirt Series
    Shirt Series

    A collaborative story exploring Shirt-making & Hand-embroidery.

    As a practice in mindful observation of the spaces around him, Areez participates in a daily ritual that involves a documentation of rudimentary forms and linear movements. These studies attempted to record synaesthesic experiences that a body might have when it transits between natural and urban spaces. All studies for this Shirt Series were initially made on cotton paper using aquatint pigment & ink - using a refined palette of 5 colours that were predetermined through collaboration with Sherie Muijs.

    These studies were then transcribed from paper to Lithuanian linen textiles through the process of hand-embroidery using 100% French cotton thread. Pocket panels for Shirts No. 21 and 22 are placed as pairs - otherwise known as a Diptych. While Shirt Dress No. 23 is a fully embroidered garment, freely exploring the playful nature of Katki's artwork. Through the hand-worked treatment of each panel and the meticulous construction of the shirts they are placed with, one might consider how this process challenges the fading presence of fine craft in relation to contemporary design.

    Shirt Series
    Shirt Series
    Shirt Series
    '

    Shirt Series

    '

    Textile Collaboration with Sherie Muijs
    Developed 2017-2018
    Phorographs by Greta Van Der Star

  • '

    Constantinople Dress & Cordoba Diptych

    '

    Beauty Is In The Street
    Objectspace
    August – September 2016
    Curated by Elle Loui August

    Constantinople Dress & Cordoba Diptych
    Constantinople Dress & Cordoba Diptych

    The colour planes of these handmade textile panels explore synaesthesia based on experiences recollected from the Katki’s time in Istanbul. Thrace and Anatolia are two continental land masses on either side of the Bospherous River, separating Asia from Europe. Living and working in Istanbul resulted in daily ferry trips between two continents and experiencing vivid juxtapositions of coexisting cultures.

    From the 'Textile + Form' Series, remnants of handwoven upholstery textiles were discovered upon extensive social and historic research while he lived in Madrid. A study of their historic techniques led to acquiring intriguing curtain samplers and the variations of textiles which were hand-crafted between 1940-1970 at Casa Hernanz in Madrid. Such samplers were carefully composed with hand-embroidery based on architectural lines extracted from cities around Spain.

    Constantinople Dress & Cordoba Diptych
    '

    Constantinople Dress & Cordoba Diptych

    '

    Beauty Is In The Street
    Objectspace
    August – September 2016
    Curated by Elle Loui August

  • '

    Textile + Form Series

    '

    MRKT
    All Press Gallery
    February 2016

    Textile + Form Series
    Textile + Form Series

    A series of linear architectural studies on repurposed Spanish upholstery textiles.

    Sourced during Katki’s years in Madrid where he accessed and repurposed remnants of iconic household textiles from 1944 to the mid-1970’s, which are no longer in production.

    Textile + Form Series
    '

    Textile + Form Series

    '

    MRKT
    All Press Gallery
    February 2016

AREEZ KATKI STUDIO

Direct Enquiries: areez@areezkatki.co

NZ: +64 21 08755727
IN: +91 74002 75249

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